Buffalo & Erie County Public Library
Online Reading Contest
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If you have forgotten your user name or password or require additional assistance please call 858-8900.

   Adult Online Reading Contest 2017       Summer Reading Contest for Teens 2017       Summer Reading Contest for Organizations and Camps 2017       Summer Reading Contest for Kids 2017   
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Important Messages


Adult Summer Reading Contest

For Readers Ages 17 & Up

The Contest Begins June 12th, 2017

The Contest Ends August 25th, 2017



What to Do For Your Book Reviews

Summer reading participants are asked to write BRIEF book reviews, each of which counts as an entry in a prize drawing. The more reviews you submit, the more chances you have to win!
Submissions can be Adult or Young-Adult, Fiction, Graphic Novels or Non-Fiction. NO children’s titles, please!


Please Include:

A BRIEF description of the book..... One to two paragraphs. What’s it about?
Did you like the book...Why or why not? Would you recommend it to others?
You may also include: Are there similar authors or titles others might like? Have you liked other works by the author?

Please do not include:

Spoilers! Please do not reveal crucial plot elements
Children’s books
Profanity, obscenities, or spiteful remarks
Phone numbers, mailing addresses, or URLs

The library reserves the right to edit or remove reviews that do not follow these guidelines.

If you participated in our Winter Reading Contest you will have to create a new profile with a new user name and password for the Summer Reading Contest. All participants’ records are deleted shortly after the conclusion of the contests each season.

You could be the lucky winner of one of many prizes including the

Grand Prize…
An AMAZON KINDLE FIRE HDX
Or a $25 Amazon Gift Card awarded to each library branch winner
Winners will be notified by email or telephone after Friday September 8th, 2017.

Reviews
Review
In the late 1970's Dewey Bozell was wrongfully convicted of murdering Emma Crapser, age 92 of Poughkeepsie, New York. Having grown up in foster homes, resulting in a bad home life, nobody seemed to care about him. He was always swayed by trouble or looking for it.

Adapting to prison life at Sing Sing wasn't easy. Inmates always had to find ways to protect themselves, even from the guards. New evidence appears while Bozella is still trying to clear his name. His lawyers requested a new trial. Upon receiving his freedom, Bozella lived by his words of wisdom: fear, commitment, persistence, hope, faith, and forgiveness. Bozella became a counselor for a non-profit organization that helps parolees. He was a finalist for the prestigious ESPN Arthur Ashe award. He also received his boxing license.
Title
Stand Tall
Author
Dewey Bozella
Rating
4
Review
Dana Perino is a popular host on Fox News, the Five with over two million followers on social media. Dana is warm, charming and insightful. However, the real star is Jasper, her Vizsla, aka "America's Dog."

After writing "And the Good News Is," Dana had to cut ten thousand words from her manuscript. Her editor wasn't fond of dogs, but the book contains the latest news about Jasper. Jasper is photographed and put on social media in every aspect of his life."America's Dog" is more like a celebrity, or maybe more human than you know. Only dog lovers need to apply.
Title
Let Me Tell You About Jasper
Author
Dana Perino
Rating
4
Review
This book entails all aspects of dominant sports, baseball, football, hockey, basketball, soccer, and the list goes on. The book describes in great detail highlights from world series games, the Stanley Cup playoffs, champion ship basketball games and the last super bowl. Any sports junkie will enjoy this book.
Title
The Most Dominant Dynastics of All Time
Author
Brian Trusdell
Rating
4
Review
Miss Ruffles, a pedigreed herding dog, and mascot for the local college inherits a sizable estate from her owner to be shared with long time domestic employees. Certain conditions apply which must be met my Miss Ruffles's dog walker/care giver within a year. The fun, intrigue, and excitement begin!

I enjoyed the book very much, and I plan to read other books by this author.

Title
Miss Ruffles Inherits Everything
Author
Nancy Martin
Rating
5
Review
In "Sick Building Syndrome and the Problem of Uncertainty: Environmental Politics", Michelle Murphy “highlights the versatile and volatile work of gender in twentieth-century practices of rendering environmental health hazards perceptible and knowable. In the 1980s, gender and chemical exposures both generated controversy and uncertainty” (pg. 6). She argues that indoor chemical exposures “came into being through multiple histories that did not all agree on the terms by which an exposure could be shown to have happened or not” (pg. 8). Finally, Murphy “suggests regimes of perceptibility actively participated in making chemical exposures the phenomena they are today. In order to throw imperceptibility into relief through juxtaposition, this book makes a second argument about the historical ontology of exposure: objects are many things at once” (pg. 10). In this manner, Murphy’s work uses Sick Building Syndrome to examine the intersections of race, gender, class, and science.
Of class, Murphy writes, “Sick building syndrome was a problem only possible in conditions of relative privilege and luxury that characterized Reagan-era America. It captured those minor health complaints only foregrounded when larger dangers receded. It expressed an expectation of comfort and safety as conditions of daily life for the beneficiaries of the privileges of race and class” (pg. 3). Race played a critical role in defining class, as Murphy writes, “Historians of science have tended to take up questions of race only when examining acts of racism or when ‘race’ has been the subject of science. Much less attention has been paid to the inverse subject of racialized disadvantage – the work of racialized privilege” (pg. 112). Class and gender intersected, as “the middle-class gendering of office work that was built into its very walls was fundamental to the covering over of class stratifications that were built into its very machines” (pg. 56).
Murphy writes of gender, “During the 1970s, a resurgent feminism and a newly articulated environmentalism spawned an office-workers movement that made occupational health, and particularly chemical exposures, one of its concerns” (pg. 3). Office buildings were uniquely situated to play host to clashes between older gender ideologies and the consciousness-raising of feminists. Murphy writes, “Office buildings were not just luxurious spaces for the American managerial class: they were also constructed to promote the efficient labor of the droves of mostly women in the office’s lower ranks. Perceptions about the physiological needs of these laborers were built into the very pipes and ducts of office buildings” (pg. 19). The bounds of comfort were primarily dictated by men, as “optimum climate was charted through measurements largely taken from the bodies of young, white college men” (pg. 25). When officials examined Sick Building Syndrome complaints, they reflected the gendered assumptions of their time and of corporate culture. Murphy writes, “Investigators at NIOSH [the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health] found themselves turning to psychosomatic explanations, such as mass hysteria and mass psychogenic illness (MPI), to make sense of the variety and nonspecificity of women office workers’ complaints. Perhaps, some investigators suggested, such symptoms were a gendered psychological response to life stresses” (pg. 71). NIOSH opinions were divided into two camps. Murphy writes, “One arguing that indoor pollution existed in chronic and non-specific forms and that sick building syndrome was a legitimate phenomenon, the other holding that sick building syndrome was a misnomer for what was better understood as a gendered psychological delusion” (pg. 83).
Ironically, the tobacco industry brought Sick Building Syndrome to the forefront as its nonspecific cause aided their effort to combat efforts to regulate secondhand smoke and “promote an ecological and systems approach to indoor pollution” (pg. 132). For them, “The appeal of sick building syndrome was that pollution and its effects could be materialized in a way impossible to regulate – as an unpredictable multiplicity” (pg. 148). In this manner, Murphy argues, “The terms by which sick building syndrome was granted existence…were the result of a contested ontological politics” (pg. 149).
Title
Sick Building Syndrome and the Problem of Uncertainty: Environmental Politics
Author
Michelle Murphy
Rating
4